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What happens after the epidural

What happens after the epidural


After a birth through epidural anesthesia you have some risks but also benefits. Usually, you receive information about epidural anesthesia and how it proceeds, starting with the moment of the breathing courses for birth and until the catheter is placed or even shortly thereafter.
But no one informs you what happens after you have gone through labor with epidural anesthesia. Read on to find out some of your questions.
When the catheter can be removed
Normally, the catheter can be removed one or two hours after birth, in the case of a normal (vaginal) birth. Usually, removing the catheter is not painful, but you may feel a slight discomfort as it exits the column. Mum's opinion is that removing the adhesive tape is more painful than that of the catheter.
If you give birth through caesarean section, it is sometimes possible that the catheter may be left for a few hours to relieve your pain after birth. The anesthesiologist can administer pain relievers through the catheter before removing it, to ensure further pain relief.
If after birth you have opted for a uterine tube ligation, the catheter will remain mounted until after the operation, when it will be removed by the anesthetist or nurse.
How long does epidural sedation last?
Moms claim that they can move their toes and that their senses can easily return within hours of discontinuing the anesthetic. If the epidural you have chosen is a continuous one, you will return in about six hours from the moment the anesthetic administration was stopped. In the case of discontinued epidural, the return to normal depends on how long it has been since the last dose of anesthetic was administered.
Some mothers may experience tingling, tremor, numbness, or other sensations in the area of ​​the feet during and after epidural anesthesia. These sensations are normal in most cases, but it is necessary to communicate them to the nurse or anesthesiologist, to ensure that there is no problem.
What happens to the urinary tract
The urine is removed when the mother is able to stand on her feet. However, if there are urinary problems after birth, the probe will most likely be put in place until the problem is resolved.
What can you expect
You may feel unpleasant after passing the effect of the anesthetic, but it is advisable to start taking the medicines prescribed by your doctor immediately, preferably before the anesthetic effect passes.
When choosing an epidural anesthesia you are more likely to have an episiotomy, forceps, vacuum or caesarean section. All of this intensifies postnatal pain, so start with non-narcotic medication, to see if it can help you get rid of pain, and continue with stronger painkillers if necessary.
The fact that your body has been in the same position for the duration of labor can contribute to the feeling of numbness, so it will be helpful or even enough to stretch your muscles a little. This sensation can also come from the great efforts to push under the effect of the epidural, due to the inability to feel and correctly appreciate the intensity required for the expulsion of the fetus.
Get out of bed and try to go immediately as you will feel, to regain control over your body and to speed recovery.
For more information on epidural anesthesia generally read the article Epidural anesthesia at birth.