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Hypertension is not caused by excessive coffee consumption

Hypertension is not caused by excessive coffee consumption


A new study says healthy, coffee-loving people can still enjoy it in terms of blood pressure, as caffeine from coffee and other foods can cause blood pressure to rise in the short term. Thus, there were concerns that over time this would lead to increased blood pressure in the long term, but studies on this case have reached other results.
In the new study, published by the American Journal of Nutrition, the researchers found healthy women who drink up to 6 cups of coffee a day, which are no longer exposed to increased blood pressure than non-drinkers.
On the other hand, women who occasionally or moderately drink (between 0-3 cups of coffee a day) have a high risk of having an increase in blood pressure, much higher than those who are unsuccessful or those who drink heavily.
For men, the risk of high blood pressure did not decrease, but did not increase depending on the amount of coffee drunk per day. In any case, men who drink coffee really have a minimal risk to drinkers.
One of the researchers says: "Given the results of the study, including studies that suggest health benefits such as lower risk of diabetes - there seems to be no reason to worry about coffee drinkers."
The initial research comes 11 years ago when 6,400 men and women up to 40 years old participated in a questionnaire on their diet, including coffee drinking, daily schedule, education and medical history.
In the next 11 years, the researchers found that coffee drinkers (0-3 cups of coffee / day) are much more likely to raise blood pressure than non-drinkers or those who drink a lot of coffee daily.
A probable reason, according to the team that conducted the new study, is that people who drink coffee every day have become tolerant to increasing blood pressure due to caffeine, while those who drink less are more sensitive.
Even though, caffeine increases blood pressure in some people, studies have failed to show that it really represents a risk of heart disease in healthy people.
The study focuses on healthy adults, and its conclusions are not addressed to people with high blood pressure or heart disease.
Laura Moise
Editor
March 22, 2007