Comments

Circumcision could prevent HIV infection

Circumcision could prevent HIV infection

Circumcision could be a powerful brake in the process of endemic spread of the HIV virus that causes AIDS, if the efficacy of this medical practice will be confirmed by a series of ongoing studies, but the adoption of circumcision for medical reasons must first overcome. the numerous cultural barriers, it was specified in a report discussed in Toronto on Thursday at the International AIDS Conference, informs AFP consulted by Rompres.


Circumcision could be a powerful brake in the process of endemic spread of the HIV virus that causes AIDS, if the efficacy of this medical practice will be confirmed by a series of ongoing studies, but the adoption of circumcision for medical reasons must first overcome. the numerous cultural barriers, it was specified in a report discussed in Toronto on Thursday at the International AIDS Conference, informs AFP consulted by Rompres.
Currently, two studies are underway in Uganda and Kenya respectively, which seek to highlight the link between circumcision and the transmission of HIV from woman to man. These studies will be completed in July and September 2007 respectively.
The results of these studies are highly anticipated because they will enable the verification of a first study whose results have been very promising, "said representatives of several UN and World Bank agencies for HIV / AIDS in Toronto.
In 2005, a team of researchers funded by the French HIV / AIDS Research Agency (ANRS) conducted a study on 3,000 men from Orange Farm in South Africa. According to this study, circumcision reduces the risk of HIV transmission from woman to man by about 60%.
This increased protection against the likelihood of contamination results from the considerable reduction in circumcision of the exposed skin surface, which contains numerous immune cells (dentitic cells) that are highly sensitive to contamination with the HIV virus.
Catherine Hankins from UNAIDS, the UN agency coordinating the global fight against the AIDS scourge, has drawn attention, however, to the cultural barriers that such a method of disease prevention must overcome.
"In some cultures you are not considered a man unless you are circumcised, and in other cultures the situation is exactly the opposite," she commented.
Rompres
August 21, 2006