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Infants absorb nicotine even when their parents smoke in another room

Infants absorb nicotine even when their parents smoke in another room

In spite of the fact that parents smoke in another room or at a distance from their child, infants seem to still absorb dangerous chemicals from them.

In spite of the fact that parents smoke in another room or at a distance from their child, infants seem to still absorb dangerous chemicals from them.
Prof. Georg Matt, from the University of San Diego, states that up to 90% of nicotine from cigarette smoke can remain attached to walls, clothes, hair or skin.
Prof. Matt said that following his research he came to the conclusion that these chemicals can be swallowed, inhaled or absorbed through the skin of non-smokers, thus endangering the health of infants.
His study was based on observations made on a batch of 49 infants, under the age of 13 months, who found cotine, a nicotine derivative, in their urine and hair even when their parents were careful to smoke. outside the house.

In these infants, the cotina was 7 times higher than in infants with non-smoking parents.
Infants and young children seem to be able to absorb harmful chemicals by simply touching the furniture in a smoker's home or by hugging their mothers after they have smoked.
In infants and children exposed to a polluted environment it is known that the risk of developing asthma attacks and pulmonary infections is twice as high compared to children raised in an unpolluted environment and children from the polluted environment are more frequently needed. hospitalization in the first year of life.
Also, children exposed to cigarette smoke have an increased risk of sudden death.
Other researchers believe that the lower weight (about 250g) of newborns from smoking parents is one of the factors that negatively influence labor during labor.
Source: Sfatulmedicului.ro