In detail

Phosphorus

Phosphorus

This chemical element, which is found in certain foods, is absorbed into the intestine and spreads into the body in the form of phosphate. It is deposited in bones (85% of the phosphate intake), in mineral form, and in the blood, incorporated in organic substances. Phosphorus is evenly distributed in all cells; In terms of quantity, it is the second mineral that is important in the body. Large consumers of soft drinks should pay special attention to the properties of phosphorus, as this may be the basis for certain health disorders.

This chemical element, which is found in certain foods, is absorbed into the intestine and spreads into the body in the form of phosphate. It is deposited in bones (85% of the phosphate intake), in mineral form, and in the blood, incorporated in organic substances. Phosphorus is evenly distributed in all cells; In terms of quantity, it is the second mineral that is important in the body. Large consumers of soft drinks should pay special attention to the properties of phosphorus, as this may be the basis for certain health disorders.
Recommended daily dose: 1000 mg.
sources
Food sources are: dried fruits, lean meat (minced beef, chicken), fish (salmon, shrimp), skim milk, broccoli, corn. Phosphoric acid enters the composition of gaseous drinks in large quantities.
Roles and features
- participates in the synthesis of phospholipid cells (such as lecithin), which carry fat;
- provides energy fuel for the body;
- increases bone strength, in combination with calcium, and ensures growth;
- enters the constitution of nucleic proteins (DNA and RNA);
- enters the composition of myelin, a substance that "envelops" the nerves;
- it helps the kidney function;
- contributes to the constant maintenance of the heart rate.

Disorders - deficiency or excess


Disorders attributed to phosphorus deficiency
Foods rich in phosphorus predominate in the diet, which is why deficiencies are quite rare. At the same time, several factors can interfere with the assimilation of phosphorus: sugar is a "destroyer" of the "harmony" that must exist between phosphorus and calcium; the excessive supplements of the iron compromise equally the action of the phosphorus. Also, people who suffer from chronic digestive disorders, as well as those who resort to the administration of aluminum and magnesium-based gastric antacids, have problems with phosphorus absorption and may be deficient in this precious mineral.
Dampening of the extremities, decreased muscle tone, loss of reflexes and, at a more advanced stage, demineralization of bone tissue, irregularity of breathing, neurological and cardiac disorders can all be manifestations of phosphorus deficiency.
Disorders attributed to excessive phosphorus consumption
Excess phosphorus has a direct implication on calcium, which is eliminated from the bones into the bloodstream. This loss of calcium is the source of bone fragility - the bones become more sensitive to fractures and osteoporosis - and dental. Excess phosphorus can cause hypocalcemia. Phosphorus has no toxic effect.
Useful note
- Gaseous drinks, uninterrupted from North American meals, sometimes even preferred to milk, as a snack or dessert, contain large amounts of phosphoric acid which endanger calcium absorption. If you are an avid consumer of this type of beverage, watch your calcium intake.
- People who have reached the age of 40 should know that phosphorus can be more difficult to remove from the body due to decreased kidney function; It would therefore be advisable to review their diet to avoid the unpleasant effects of calcium deficiency.
- Phosphorus supplementation is not particularly recommended unless prescribed and followed by the doctor.