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Parents, advised not to give children foods that contain artificial dyes

Parents, advised not to give children foods that contain artificial dyes

British experts say that certain food additives can lead to behavioral changes in children, which can be more agitated and have concentration problems
Parents are advised by British experts not to give children food products that contain certain additives until the results of a new study are published. British researchers are testing the effects of artificial dyes on children's behavior, according to an article published by BBC online.
The preliminary results of a previous study "linked" these additives to the onset of hyperactivity and poor concentration among children. The Food Standards Agency of the United Kingdom says there is no need for further recommendations until the results of the study appear.

But, according to the BBC online, independent experts claim that parents should avoid products containing those additives.

A team of researchers from the University of Southampton tested the additives (known as E's) E102, E124, E110, E122, E104 and E129 in children aged 3 years and in another group aged 8 years. 9 years. The quantity studied was the one that can be consumed on average, one day, by a child. All additives tested in the study are approved for use in the European Union and are safe, but some of these dyes are banned in the Scandinavian countries and the United States.
Read the whole article in Ghent
May 15, 2007