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Infants under 6 months of age should not be vaccinated against the flu

Infants under 6 months of age should not be vaccinated against the flu

People allergic to egg proteins can die if they get the vaccine

People allergic to egg proteins can die if they get the vaccine
Influenza vaccine is contraindicated for some categories of people. One of these categories includes people allergic to egg proteins because they are contained in the vaccine.
Even pregnant women in the first trimester should not get their vaccine, because the so-called post-vaccine flu, which affects the fetus, may occur. Vaccination is not recommended for new mothers in the first three months after birth, because the virus passes into milk and can affect the newborn.
Also, in infants under 6 months of age, the vaccine is contraindicated, because they do not have the sufficiently developed immune system and can cause serious diseases, such as bronchiosolitis, laryngotracheitis (by upper airway obstruction) and encephalitis.

Administering the vaccine to egg allergies can lead to a major allergic reaction - patients swell, can no longer breathe and risk of death.
For some, the vaccine causes the flu
Contraindications to the flu vaccine also have patients with low immunity, those who had encephalitis and the patients whose family doctor, following a consultation, says this. If patients with immunity problems get vaccinated, they can get the flu because their body is not able to produce antibodies. There are also contraindications and people who have had encephalitis (because of the risk of death).
The flu effects of the vaccine are felt after a minimum of two weeks and lasts throughout the cold season.
Adverse reactions rarely occur
"There is a possibility that, after administration of the vaccine, some adverse reactions may occur, fever 37.5-38 degrees C, poor general condition, abundant nasal secretions and irritant cough, but in general, they are of low intensity and short duration. Adverse effects are found in 20-30% of those vaccinated, "says Dr. Adrian Streinu-Cercel, primary physician of infectious diseases and director of the Institute of Infectious Diseases" Prof. Dr. Matei Bals ", in the capital.
The flu vaccine contains live viruses that cannot cause the disease, but cause the body to produce antibodies (scientifically called immunoglobulins). Antibodies are proteins in the blood that protect the body from foreign substances.
"Some side effects may occur after the vaccine is administered, but they are of low intensity and of short duration."
Adrian Streinu-Cercel,
director of the Institute of Infectious Diseases "Matei Bals"
Source: The Event of the Day