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Mothers with children suffering from autistic stress, but optimistic

Mothers with children suffering from autistic stress, but optimistic

A new study reveals that mothers with children with autism are subjected to high levels of stress than other mothers and yet they seem to have remarkable power to cooperate with their child and the disease. Using data from a national study based on child health, the researchers observed that mothers who have children with autism do not see their emotional and poor health status.

A new study reveals that mothers with children with autism are subjected to high levels of stress than other mothers and yet they seem to have remarkable power to cooperate with their child and the disease. Using data from a national study based on child health, the researchers observed that mothers who have children with autism do not see their emotional and poor health status.
On the other hand, they revealed that they have more confidence in their parenting qualities and are unlikely to have a mediocre relationship with their child. No evidence has yet been found to support the fact that autism could bring stress on the family. The results of the study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, are very good news for both parents and children, says the study's author, Dr.

Guillermo Montes from the Children's Institute of Rochester, New York.
Raising a child with autism can bring both stress and challenge to their parents' lives, but it is impressive to find that mothers have a good life beyond the problems. Dr. Montes says that it is possible that mothers who have children with autism have something to teach us all about what it means to be a good parent and to have a close relationship with your child, beyond serious challenges.
Autism is a spectrum disorder, meaning that it affects children in different ways, to varying degrees of severity, on the ability to communicate, think and interact on a social level. Because there is nothing abnormal about the physical side of an autism patient and because children develop each in their own way, the disorder can be difficult to recognize.
Some studies have suggested that parents with children with autism have marital problems and often feel neglected emotionally. In any case, many of these cases involve families who have come to specialized clinics or belonged to the society affected by autism, which shows that this cannot be true for all families affected by autism. Dr. Montes and his colleague, Dr. Jill S. Halterman, used data from a national study that included the mothers of 61,772 children between the ages of 4 and 17, of whom 364 were affected by autism.
In the questionnaire, mothers with children with autism responded that they did not get upset with their child and responded similarly to other mothers regarding family misunderstandings. "I think that mothers with children with autism can learn a lot about how to maintain a close relationship with our child, in the context of stress and poor social values," says Dr. Montes.
May 11, 2007